This Is What I Learned From Publishing My First 50 Posts


I didn’t set out to write 50 posts. In fact I didn’t set out to write any posts. So why did I and what have I learnt from it?

It’s not until you sit back and have a good think about it that you realise that we all go through a lot in our life. I wouldn’t call my life extraordinary in any way but I think I do have a lot of experiences in business, sport and raising 3 kids that was worth documenting. In fact I am sure we all have enough life experience to be worth documenting.

I started travelling to Latin America for business regularly and with plenty time sitting on planes I started to write about my business journey which had to touch on my sporting life since the two collided very early on.

When I started writing I wasn’t going to post on LinkedIn or my own blog. I simply had a will to write down my journey.
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After a while I had written pages of notes and then started to think about what I should do with them. I wasn’t going to write a book so the notion of registering my own domain (paulbarlow.com.au) and loading a WordPress blog site on there appealed to me.

Like most things I do, I had to do it straight away so did and posted my first blog with a promise to make it regular. I didn’t make it regular, in fact I left it for well over a year but in that time I didn’t stop writing, I just didn’t post.

I then started to notice more and more people posting their own articles on LinkedIn and I was reading them. It was then that I thought I might have something of interest or value to some people through this platform. So at the end of February this year I started posting short blogs on LinkedIn and simultaneously to my own web site.

My goal wasn’t to go viral; I just wanted to post my stories, my thoughts, experiences and along the way; I suppose to help to develop my own brand.

Again like most things I’m passionate about, I started to post nearly twice a week (and I had to stop myself from posting more). I didn’t want to overload on the posting but I couldn’t help myself. I had so much material ready to go I just wanted it out there.
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It’s funny; I’m not too fussed about how many people read, like and/or comment on my posts but I do get a buzz when people from the office mention that they read and enjoy my posts. I like it that they have a view inside my window.

So what have I learnt from my first 50 posts?

Writing about your experiences, your beliefs is therapeutic.
Having a platform to then publish these thoughts is nice. The thing about publishing versus not publishing is that you have to put thought into who may read it so there has to be a filter in what you say. I think this is a good discipline because it is not about venting it is about opening yourself up and being balanced in your thoughts.

We all have different definitions of success.
For some it is to be the absolute best in anything they do (even this takes on different meaning). For some it is measured by material things such as how much they earn, their position/title, the size of their house, car, etc. For others it is about just being happy with their lot in life. This is important for everyone; we are all different and it would be a boring world if we weren’t.

You must be prepared for not everyone agreeing with or liking what you have to say.
Again, we are all different and it is the very essence why I like posting. I don’t claim to be right all the time but I will claim to have an opinion.

If you are thinking about doing it, just do it (to borrow a line).
Too many people have ideas of things they want to do but just don’t make the effort to do it. If something keeps knocking on your door the best thing to do is open that door. You’ll soon know if you don’t want to do it anymore or if it’s not for you.

I will keep on writing and posting for as long as I enjoy it and have something to write about. The latter shouldn’t be a problem because I have no doubt that no matter who you are, we all have an opinion and something to talk about that can be of value to someone.

And if it’s not – who cares?


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